This is where the cool title would go

22,202 notes

too-spoopy-to-be-frukd:

whoduhthunkit:

depressingfinland:

chibisuz:

depressingfinland:

234937289:

Bus seats in Finland - for the unsocial people, like me.

Rule number one in Finnish public transport culture: Don’t sit next to anyone. Unless the seats are like this.In every other cases fill the spots from window seats. Then standing up seats. If the bus gets crowded sit next to someone but sit as far as possible from the other person and turn your head to look to the completely different direction. Don’t say a word. And if you’re the one sitting next to window pray all the gods that the other person leaves before you, because otherwise you’d have to speak to him/her. Usually it’s something like “Umm..ileavenow”. Remember, no sorries or smiles. Just say it as low and fast as possible without making any eye contact. 

legit advise for people visiting finland. that “ileavenow” is “mä jään täs” in finnish. it’s okay if you don’t pronounce it perfectly right because the only reason someone would talk to strangers in public transport is to ask them to move, so they will get the hint. 
BUT! usually just things like putting your phone away and rustling your bag and looking like you are about to leave will do the trick. no need for words.
….and this is how you wait for a bus in finland:


Reblogging because of that picture. So true. And familiar.

This is the most bizarre thing I’ve ever seen…what the actual fuck. It almost seems like a joke but I feel like it’s actually serious????

This is very true and something every tourist should remember

too-spoopy-to-be-frukd:

whoduhthunkit:

depressingfinland:

chibisuz:

depressingfinland:

234937289:

Bus seats in Finland - for the unsocial people, like me.

Rule number one in Finnish public transport culture: Don’t sit next to anyone. Unless the seats are like this.

In every other cases fill the spots from window seats. Then standing up seats. If the bus gets crowded sit next to someone but sit as far as possible from the other person and turn your head to look to the completely different direction. Don’t say a word. 

And if you’re the one sitting next to window pray all the gods that the other person leaves before you, because otherwise you’d have to speak to him/her. Usually it’s something like “Umm..ileavenow”. Remember, no sorries or smiles. Just say it as low and fast as possible without making any eye contact. 

legit advise for people visiting finland. that “ileavenow” is “mä jään täs” in finnish. it’s okay if you don’t pronounce it perfectly right because the only reason someone would talk to strangers in public transport is to ask them to move, so they will get the hint. 

BUT! usually just things like putting your phone away and rustling your bag and looking like you are about to leave will do the trick. no need for words.

….and this is how you wait for a bus in finland:

image

Reblogging because of that picture. So true. And familiar.

This is the most bizarre thing I’ve ever seen…what the actual fuck. It almost seems like a joke but I feel like it’s actually serious????

This is very true and something every tourist should remember

(via you-always-feel-it-sherlock)

10,216 notes

sukideen:

The red string of fate, is an East Asian belief originating from Chinese legend and is also used in Japanese legend. According to this myth, the gods tie an invisible red string around the fingers of those that are destined to meet each other in a certain situation or help each other in a certain way. According to Chinese legend, the deity in charge of “the red thread” is believed to be Yuè Xià Lǎo (月下老, often abbreviated to “Yuèlǎo” [月老]), the old lunar matchmaker god who is also in charge of marriages.
The two people connected by the red thread are destined lovers, regardless of time, place, or circumstances. This magical cord may stretch or tangle, but never break. This myth is similar to the Western concept of soulmates or a twin flame.

sukideen:

The red string of fate, is an East Asian belief originating from Chinese legend and is also used in Japanese legend. According to this myth, the gods tie an invisible red string around the fingers of those that are destined to meet each other in a certain situation or help each other in a certain way. According to Chinese legend, the deity in charge of “the red thread” is believed to be Yuè Xià Lǎo (月下老, often abbreviated to “Yuèlǎo” [月老]), the old lunar matchmaker god who is also in charge of marriages.

The two people connected by the red thread are destined lovers, regardless of time, place, or circumstances. This magical cord may stretch or tangle, but never break. This myth is similar to the Western concept of soulmates or a twin flame.

(via avatarious)

181,347 notes

bagmilk:

dslubes:

macintush:

"BLESS THIS POST"

shut up

"WHY DOESNT THIS HAVE MORE NOTES"

shut up

"ITS BACK"

shut up

"reblogging again"

shut up

"this"

shut up

"finally someone said it"

shut up

finally someone said it omg bless this post i’m reblogging again because it’s back why doesn’t it have more notes omg

(via huffelpoof)